Wednesday, August 25, 2010

Big Time NCAA Sports Means A Smaller Library

The report is in. ESPN.com reports that only 14 of the 120 athletic departments with football programs tied into the bowl system made money in 2009.

Read the report here.

Since most people argue that big time college sports is good for higher ed since it makes more money, this report should make for some interesting conversations. It should, but it won't....

With so many universities facing budget cutbacks, layoffs, or hiring freezes, and with the large majority of athletic departments running on average a $10 million deficit... well....

4 comments:

Jeremy said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Jeremy said...

Two problems.

1. The bigger the program, the less it needs subsidies. http://www.sltrib.com/sltrib/home/49688069-73/schools-student-sports-university.html.csp

2. It's fallacious to assume that money not spent on athletics would end up in the library (or in any other academic purpose).

Jeremy said...

Ooo ooo! Also, does Title IX play into this by forcing programs to include revenue-draining sports? Discuss.

Corry Cropper said...

True, it may not end up in the library, but it does come from a university's general fund...

And yes, I suspect non BCS schools are in the red more than BCS schools.

Re. Title IX, I don't know. The anecdotes I've heard, though, suggest that women's sports run on such a small budget that it barely moves the needle.