Tuesday, February 23, 2010

Why Figure Skating is NOT a Sport



I really want to retract what I wrote three posts ago. And after seeing this couple dancing in their "uniforms" I could not stomach it any longer... (they did take the bronze, after all). It may be a sport in the broadest, most open-minded sense possible, but I need some more time to come around to that way of thinking. A lot more time.

And, to continue my whine, I am sick of NBC prepackaging the evening broadcast to show almost continuous figure skating, only occasionally interrupted by something interesting. And have you noticed that NBC frequently will not show the scores for figure skaters? It's as if it weren't a real sport...

6 comments:

dastew said...

What got me irate was the complete absence of Olympic Hockey that night. US vs. Canada in a sport with whom NBC is a "broadcast partner". How do they justify the 20 seconds of coverage they gave on the network? What's worse is they showed the Russia v Czech match in its entirety.

Corry Cropper said...

They did cut away for the last 20 seconds of the match, then waited another fifteen minutes before showing 10 seconds of highlights.

I can only conclude that they are going for a non-sports fan audience. But still, there has to be a more reasonable sense of what's interesting....

SM Sprenger said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
Sven Wilson said...

Shouldn't you distinguish between ice dancing and figure skating?

The reason NBC shows so much skating is that it is aesthetically pleasing, personal, and, most of all, *variable.* Contrast this with bobsledding or ski jumping. You seen one bobsled run, you've seen them all!

Frankly, most olympic sports are far better presented as highlights than as complete events. Sure, there are some dramatic finishes in cross-country, but do you really want to watch the whole thing (I admit the shooting parts of biathalon are kinda cool)?

Maybe if I drank a lot of alcohol, I could watch bobsled. I'm sure that is what keeps Nascar fans engaged in their "sport."

Corry Cropper said...

I have heard that most Canadians do drink beer in order to get through an entire curling match....

Besides the music and the costumes, though, there is little variation between the skaters. I mean by this that they all have to perform a large number of required elements. There is, to be sure, more variation than in bobsled, but perhaps no more than in skiing, where styles differ as do the lines skiers take into gates.

Perhaps we should require bobsleders to pick music to be played during their descents.

Sven Wilson said...

If skiers all wore dramatic costumes, were half-naked, and skied to music, I might agree with you.